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Hyaluronic Acid Center, Neptune Krill Oil & Rejuvenation Science for Doctors

Sunday, April 30, 2006

Omega-3 Rich Diet Lowers Blood Pressure

Consumption of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) lowers blood pressure (BP), according to results of a clinical trial published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

In the three-month, randomized study, healthy subjects followed isoenergetic diets rich in either MUFAs or in saturated fatty acids. Consumption of the MUFA diet was associated with lowered systolic BP and significantly reduced diastolic BP; the saturated fatty acid diet produced no change in BP.

Read details on this omega-3 blood pressure study.

Saturday, April 29, 2006

Higher Serum Vitamin D Levels = Lower Breast Cancer Risk

The results of a pooled analysis of 1,760 women confirmed that having higher levels of the vitamin D metabolite serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with a lower risk of breast cancer.

The research team found that having a serum vitamin D level of 52 nanograms per milliliter was associated with a 50 percent reduction in breast cancer risk. To attain this level of the vitamin, it would be necessary to consume at least 1,000 international units (IU) of vitamin.

The researchers recommend that at least 1,000 IU per day vitamin D3 be consumed until further studies are conducted.

View details on this vitamin D breast cancer study.

Friday, April 28, 2006

Selenium Helps Protect Against Colon Cancer

As the fourth most common cancer in men behind skin, prostate, and lung cancer, colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 71,820 U.S. men in 2005. Since its cause is unknown and doctors can seldom explain why one person develops the disease and another does not, all we have right now are risk factors to identify who has a greater risk of getting the disease. These colon cancer risk factors include being over 50 years of age, the presence of colorectal polyps (growths on the inner wall of the colon or rectum) and family history.

Fortunately, research has identified a number of ways to help prevent colon cancer, including fiber, broccoli, vitamin B6, cranberry, olive oil and magnesium.

A study in the February 2006 issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention says selenium may help prevent colon cancer.

Read details on this selenium colon cancer study.

Thursday, April 27, 2006

Raising Vitamin D Intake Cuts Cancer Risk 30%

Raising the RDA of vitamin D from 400 IU to 1500 IU could cut the number of deaths from cancer by 30 percent, say the scientists investigating the link between vitamin D levels and cancer risk.

Vitamin D refers to two biologically inactive precursors – D3, also known as cholecalciferol, and D2, also known as ergocalciferol. Vitamin D3, produced in the skin on exposure to UVB radiation (290 to 320 nm), is said to be twice as bioactive as vitamin D2, which is derived from plants and only enters the body via the diet.

“In this cohort analysis, a 25(OH)D increment of 25 nanomoles per litre (nm/L) was associated with a 17 per cent reduction in total cancer incidence, a 29 per cent reduction in total cancer mortality, and a 45 per cent reduction in mortality of digestive-system cancer,” wrote Giovannucci in the April 2006 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Read details of this vitamin D cancer risk study.

Wednesday, April 26, 2006

High-dose Vitamin D Supplements Act as Anti-inflammatory

A high-dose vitamin D supplement inhibit pro-inflammatory and boost anti-inflammatory molecules and could help people with heart failure, says a German clinical trial.

The trial followed the effects of a high-dose vitamin D3 supplement (2000 International Units) on cytokine levels and heart pumping ability of 123 patients with congestive heart failure. Levels of TNF-alpha did not differ significantly before or after supplementation with vitamin D, but it did increase by 12 per cent in the placebo group. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) levels increased by an impressive 43 per cent in the supplemented group, but did not change in the placebo group.

Read details on the meaning of these changes in this vitamin D anti-inflammatory congestive heart failure study.

Tuesday, April 25, 2006

Vitamin D Supplements Show Anti-inflammatory Benefit for Congestive Heart Failure

High-dose vitamin D supplements inhibit pro-inflammatory and boost anti-inflammatory molecules and could help people with heart failure, says a German clinical trial.

“We showed for the first time that a daily supplement of 2000 IU vitamin D for nine months is able to increase serum concentrations of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and to prevent an increase in serum concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha in CHF patients,” wrote lead author Stefanie Schleithoff from the University of Bonn, Germany.

An accompanying editorial said that the study offered two important insights: “First, the article confirms previous evidence that vitamin D supplementation affects immune-modulating cytokines in desirable ways. Second, it points to a higher Vitamin D3 dose requirement for achieving this.”

Read details on this vitamin D anti-inflammatory congestive heart failure study.

Monday, April 24, 2006

Lutein Lowers Inflammation Which is Associated with AMD

“Higher levels of serum antioxidants vitamin C and lutein/zeaxanthin and higher Omega-3 oils from fish intake were associated with lower serum c-reactive protein) CRP levels,” wrote lead author Joanna Seddon. Lower CRP levels were associated with lower risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

A healthy diet containing plenty of antioxidants and fish can reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), says this study from Harvard Medical School published April 2006 in the journal Nutrition.

“For every 1000 micrograms per decilitre increase of lutein/zeaxanthin in blood, there was a two milligrams per litre decrease in CRP,” said the researchers. A 0.2 milligrams per litre decrease in CRP was also associated with more than two servings of fish per week.

View details of this lutein inflammation macular degeneration study.

Sunday, April 23, 2006

Adequate Vitamin D Projected to Save 28,000 Lives and $20 Billion Annually from Colon Cancer

The risk of colon cancer can be reduced by 50 percent by taking a daily supplement of vitamin D, according to researchers at Moores Cancer Center of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). Researchers reported that taking 1000 IU of vitamin D daily would sharply reduce the chance of a person getting colon cancer. Colon cancer is diagnosed in about 145,000 Americans each year and claims about 56,000 U.S. lives each year.

"This paper establishes the target level of vitamin D that could reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer by half," Gorham said. Intake of 1,000 IU/day of vitamin D, half the safe upper intake established by the National Academy of Sciences, was associated with 50 percent lower risk (of colorectal cancer).

The researchers ran a cost/benefit analysis and concluded "preventing approximately half of colorectal cancer incidence by a program that would ensure vitamin D adequacy could save an estimated $20 billion per year." It could also prevent about 28,000 deaths per year, he said.

Read details on this vitamin D colon cancer meta analysis.

Saturday, April 22, 2006

Silicon Enhances Calcium's Bone Benefits

Silicon boosts the ability of calcium and vitamin D to build bone mineral density (BMD) in people suffering from osteoporosis or osteopenia (lower than normal bone density), according to a team of British researchers.

The osteoporosis subjucts were divided into four groups. All groups took 1,000 mg of calcium and 800 IU of vitamin D3. Three groups also received either 3, 6, or 12 mg of elemental silicon as orthosilic acid daily.

This study suggests that combined therapy of orthosilicic acid plus calcium and vitamin D3 is a safe, well tolerated treatment that has a potentially beneficial effect on bone turnover, especially bone collagen, and possibly femoral bone mineral density, compared to calcium and vitamin D-3 alone."

View details on this silicon calcium vitamin D3 bone mineral density study.

Friday, April 21, 2006

FDA Panel Urges Hallucination and Death Warning for Children's ADHD Drugs

A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee recommended in March 2006 that the FDA require drug makers to add information about a possible risk of hallucinations in children to the labels of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder drugs.

The committee also urged the FDA to develop a consumer-friendly medication guide that among other warnings, should note that the ADHD drugs might increase the risk of heart attack, stroke or sudden death in children who have undiagnosed heart problems.

There are such safer alternatives such as increasing Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish and krill oils, decreasing Omega-6 oils from margarine, vegetable oils and processed foods (such as potato and tortilla chips, energy bars, fried foods and salad dressings), and the elimination of sugar from kids diets.

Also see: ADHD & Omega-3 Nutritional Deficiency.

View further FDA panel recommendations on ADHD drug hallucination and death warning info.

Thursday, April 20, 2006

Avé, Containing Avemar, Receives Best New Ingredient Award

New Hope Natural Media's SupplyExpo 2006, held at the Anaheim Convention Center March 24-26, had 40 percent more exhibitors than 2005, drawn from food, beverage, supplements, botanicals and personal care ingredients businesses.

A culmination of the five-day event was the presentation of Nutracon's prestigious NutrAward for Best New Ingredient of the Year. The award was presented to American BioSciences Inc. for its immune system modulating ingredient, Avemar.

Avemar is a wheat germ derived supplement developed in Hungary to help regulate cellular metabolism and support immune health. “Avemar is best known by cancer researchers and oncologists,” president David Wales said. “This award will help us get the message out to the world at large.”

Read more highlights about Avemar and new products at SupplyExpo

Wednesday, April 19, 2006

Aspartame (Nutra-Sweet or Equal) Causes Cancer - Lymphoma, Leukemia

The final report of a seven-year study on aspartame (also known as Nutra-Sweet or Equal) has linked it to high rates of lymphomas, leukemias, and other cancers in rats. The rats were given the equivalent of four to five bottles of diet soda a day for a human.

No government regulatory agency has yet acted on the findings; there have been calls for a ban in Britain, and the European Food Safety Authority has begun a review of the study's results. United States FDA officials have said that they also intend to conduct a review.

In the mean time, consider Stevia, a 0 calorie, 0 glycemic supplement from a plant native to South America, which has traditionally been used as a natural sweetener.

Read how Aspartame causes cancer such as lymphoma and leukemia.

Tuesday, April 18, 2006

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Prevent Prostate Cancer From Spreading

In laboratory studies, scientists found that eating a diet rich with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid could stop the spread of prostate cancer, but omega-6 fatty acids appear to promote the spread, says new research. Over half a million news cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed every year world wide, and the cancer is the direct cause of over 200,000 deaths.

Omega-6 fats, the kind found in vegetable oils such as margarine, salad dressing, corn and safflower oil, increased the spread of tumor cells into bone marrow. However, the spread was blocked by omega-3 fats, suggesting that a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids could potentially inhibit the disease in men with early stage prostate cancer.

Read further details on this Omega-3 Omega-6 fatty acid prostate cancer study.

Monday, April 17, 2006

Bioavailability of Coenzyme Q10

In New Zealand, at least 10 brands of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplement are available over the counter from health food shops, pharmacies, and the Internet. Supplementation with coenzyme Q10 increases energy, wellbeing, stamina and muscle performance, strengthens the heart, and scavenges free radicals.

There was a significant difference in bioavailability between the seven CoQ10 brands, with Q-Gel being significantly better than any other supplement.

The high bioavailability of Q-Gel compared to other coenzyme Q10 supplement brands supports the findings of Chopra et al who found the absorption of Q-Gel to be 319% better than that from a standard softgel capsule containing Q10 in oil, after 3 weeks of a daily 120 mg dose. Chopra et al also found the absorption from powder-filled hardshell capsules and powder-based tablets to be higher than that from a standard softgel capsule.

View details on this coenzyme Q10 bioavailability study.

Sunday, April 16, 2006

L-Carnitine Reduces Fatigue in Advanced Cancer Patients

In recent studies, L-carnitine supplementation has been demonstrated to improve fatigue symptoms in patients with cancer.

In the present study we tested the efficacy and safety of L-carnitine supplementation in a population of patients who had advanced cancer and developed fatigue, high blood levels of reactive oxygen species, or both. Patients who had advanced tumors (50% at stage IV) at different sites were enrolled. Fatigue, as measured by the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form, decreased significantly.

View details on this L-Carnitine cancer fatigue study.

Friday, April 14, 2006

Vitamin D Has Antimicrobial Actions that Protect Against Tuberculosis

A new study indicates vitamin D3 has antimicrobial actions that can protect against bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. Published in the journal Science, vitamin D3 triggered a key antimicrobial response in humans against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB).

When vitamin D’s active form was added to the immune cells, this triggered the action of an antimicrobial peptide that helps kill intracellular TB. However, when the vitamin D receptor and vitamin D activating enzyme were inhibited, the antimicrobial peptide remained dormant.

View details of this vitamin D antimicrobial turberculosis study.

Thursday, April 13, 2006

Folate and Vitamin B12 Inhibit Breast Cancer

Consumption of folate and vitamin B12 are inversely related to risk of breast cancer, according to a population-based case-controlled study held in Mexico and published in the journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers.

Compared with women in the lowest quartile, the odds ratio for breast cancer for women in the highest quartile of folate intake was 0.64 and 0.32 for vitamin B12 intake. Among postmenopausal women in particular, intakes of folate and vitamin B12 were associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. The inverse association of folate and breast cancer was stronger among women who consumed a high level of vitamin B12 as compared with women consuming diets low in vitamin B12.

View further details on this folate vitamin B12 breast cancer study.

Wednesday, April 12, 2006

Bioavailability of Coenzyme Q10

In New Zealand, at least 10 brands of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplement are available from health food shops, pharmacies, and the Internet. Supplementation with coenzyme Q10 increases energy, wellbeing, stamina and muscle performance, strengthens the heart, and scavenges free radicals.

We found important differences in the bioavailability of these supplements, with Q-Gel being significantly better than any other supplement. There is at least a four-fold variation in the increase in plasma CoQ10 achieved by different supplements, and some people get no increase when they take the less effective supplements at typical doses.

Read details and brands evaluated in this CoenzymeQ10 bioavailability study.

Tuesday, April 11, 2006

L-Carnitine Reduces Fatigue in Advanced Cancer Patients

"In recent studies, L-carnitine supplementation has been demonstrated to improve fatigue symptoms in patients with cancer," the Italian researchers explained. "In the present study we tested the efficacy and safety of L-carnitine supplementation in a population of patients who had advanced cancer and developed fatigue, high blood levels of reactive oxygen species, or both.

"Fatigue, as measured by the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form, decreased significantly in L-Carnitine supplemented patients. Nutritional variables (lean body mass and appetite) increased significantly after L-carnitine supplementation.

Read details on this carnitine fatigue cancer study.

Monday, April 10, 2006

Vitamin D Has Antimicrobial Actions that Protect Against Tuberculosis

A new study indicates vitamin D3 has antimicrobial actions that can protect against bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. Published in the journal Science, vitamin D3 triggered a key antimicrobial response in humans against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB).

When vitamin D’s active form was added to the immune cells, this triggered the action of an antimicrobial peptide that helps kill intracellular TB. However, when the vitamin D receptor and vitamin D activating enzyme were inhibited, the antimicrobial peptide remained dormant.

Based on these results, the study authors believe that “differences in ability of human populations to produce vitamin D may contribute to susceptibility to microbial infection.”

Read further details on this vitamin D antimicrobial study.

Sunday, April 09, 2006

Folate and Vitamin B12 Inhibit Breast Cancer

Consumption of folate and vitamin B12 are inversely related to risk of breast cancer, according to a population-based case-controled study held in Mexico and published in the journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers.

Compared with women in the lowest quartile, the odds ratio for breast cancer for women in the highest quartile of folate intake was 0.64 and 0.32 for vitamin B12 intake.

The researchers concluded high intakes of folate and vitamin B12 were independently associated with decreased breast cancer risk in this cohort, particularly among postmenopausal women.

Read further details of this Harvard Medical School folate and vitamin B12 breast cancer study.

Saturday, April 08, 2006

High Dose CoenzymeQ10 Safety

An open-label dose-escalation trial was performed to assess the safety and tolerability of high doses of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. CoQ10, a cofactor in mitochondrial electron transfer, may improve the mitochondrial dysfunction in ALS. In this study, CoQ10 was safe and well tolerated in 31 subjects treated with doses as high as 3,000 mg/day for 8 months.

This initial report was limited to CoQ10 safety.

Thursday, April 06, 2006

Human Study Shows Grape Seed Extract Lowers Blood Pressure

A study presented at the American Chemical Society Meeting in March 2006 in Atlanta found that men and women with cardiovascular disease risk factors known as metabolic syndrome experienced a reduction in blood pressure after consuming grape seed extract.

Taking either 150 or 300 mg/day grape seed extract, the average drop in systolic pressure was 12 millimeters. The average drop in diastolic pressure was 8 millimeters.

Dr Kappagoda's team previously found that grape seed extract helped prevent atherosclerosis in an animal model of the disease. A second placebo-controlled clinical trial has begun at UC Davis to determine the benefits of grape seed extract on patients with prehypertension.

View details on this human grape seed blood pressure study.

Wednesday, April 05, 2006

Green Tea Protects Against Cognitive Impairment

Over 1000 Japanese subjects, ages 70 and older, were questioned about their diets, overall health, lifestyle habits and frequency of green tea consumption. All subjects underwent cognitive testing to measure memory, attention and use of language.

It was found that those with higher green tea consumption had a decreased prevalence of cognitive impairment. For example, subjects who consumed two or more cups of green tea a day had about half the chance of developing some cognitive impairment compared to those who drank three cups or less per week. The effects of green tea on cognitive functioning remained even after researchers adjusted for overall diet, smoking and exercise habits. Study authors suggested that green tea's potential ability to support brain health may explain the lower rates of Alzheimer's disease in Japan compared to Europe and North America.

View details on this green tea cognitive impairment study.

Tuesday, April 04, 2006

Both CRP and TNFalpha Predict All Cardiovascular Events

A new study in Thromb Haemost looked at the relationship between cardiovascular disease and the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

After adjustment for conventional cardiovascular disease risk factors, CRP showed a significant association with coronary heart disease risk in men. The other inflammatory marker, TNFalpha, also was a significant predictor of coronary heart disease among men. Both CRP and TNFalpha predicted all cardiovascular events and total mortality among men.

Astaxanthin Promotes Significant Reduction in Systemic Inflammation NEW
Stevia Suppresses Inflammation NEW

Read details on this CRP TNF alpha Cardio study.

Monday, April 03, 2006

Resveratrol Stops the Development of Plaques Related to Alzheimer's Disease

In a study, which appeared in the November 11, 2005 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers show that resveratrol markedly lowers the levels of secreted and intracellular amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides produced from different cell lines.

Amyloid-beta peptides form the plaques that develop in Alzheimer s disease.

Several epidemiological studies indicate that moderate consumption of wine is associated with a lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease. Wine is enriched in antioxidant compounds with potential neuroprotective activities, such as resveratrol.

Read details on this resveratrol Alxheimer's disease study.

Sunday, April 02, 2006

B Vitamins May Prevent Disease, But They Don't Cure It

Recent studies conducted in diseased populations cannot be applied to the general population or the preventative benefits of B vitamins, according to the Council for Responsible Nutrition.

Findings from the HOPE-2 and NORVIT studies on vitamins B-6, B-12 and folate supported the conclusions of a vast body of scientific research which shows that these vitamins help lower homocysteine levels, stated CRN. However, they failed to support the hypothesis that lowering homocysteine levels in persons who already have cardiovascular disease will provide protection against a future cardiovascular event.

Vitamins should not be expected to perform like drugs—their greatest promise is in prevention.

Read further details of this report on B vitamins.

Saturday, April 01, 2006

Ginger Reduces Risk of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

About 30 percent of people undergoing surgery develop postoperative nausea and vomiting. There's no way to know for certain whether you'll develop these symptoms after surgery, but certain factors increase your risk. You're more likely to develop nausea and vomiting after surgery if you are female, have a history of motion sickness, or if your surgery will last for three hours or more.

The results of several studies indicate that taking 1 gram of ginger may reduce the risk of postoperative nausea and vomiting in the first 24 hours following surgery in 31% and 39% of patients, respectively.

Read further ginger postoperative nausea study details.